What mobile isn’t

There are all kinds of clues, hints, billboards and glowing signs in the dark. We can’t afford to ignore the shift to mobile work. Here are just a few more data points, written in a helpful collection by University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor Gary Kebbel under the headline Mobile journalism: It’s not “the web only smaller”:

Mobile media are an increasingly important tool for journalists. They can deliver a new audience if you learn to adapt your content for that audience. If you’re not sold, yet, on why journalists need unique mobile skills consider a few tidbits:
62% of U.S. respondents get news from their phone weekly (Pew Research Center’s, State of the Media 2013)

36% get news from their phone daily (Pew Research Center, State of the Media 2013)

88% of U.S. adults owned a cell phone of some kind as of April 2012, and 55% of these used their phone to go online (Pew Internet and American Life Survey, “Cell Internet Use 2012”)

People with less education and income (some college or less and household incomes less than $30,000) use their cell phones as their primary means of accessing the Internet (Pew Internet and American Life Survey, “Cell Internet Use 2012”)

17% of cell phone owners do most of their online browsing on their phone, rather than a computer or other device. For some, their phone is their only option for online access. (Pew Internet and American Life Survey, “Cell Internet Use 2012”)

Don’t be surprised by the future. (Because this particular one is here, now.) Read the complete essay.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s